Asynchronous extinction of late Quaternary sloths on continents and islands.

@article{Steadman2005AsynchronousEO,
  title={Asynchronous extinction of late Quaternary sloths on continents and islands.},
  author={D. W. Steadman and Paul S. Martin and R. Macphee and A. Jull and H. Gregory McDonald and C. Woods and M. Iturralde-Vinent and G. Hodgins},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2005},
  volume={102 33},
  pages={
          11763-8
        }
}
Whatever the cause, it is extraordinary that dozens of genera of large mammals became extinct during the late Quaternary throughout the Western Hemisphere, including 90% of the genera of the xenarthran suborder Phyllophaga (sloths). Radiocarbon dates directly on dung, bones, or other tissue of extinct sloths place their "last appearance" datum at approximately 11,000 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP) or slightly less in North America, approximately 10,500 yr BP in South America, and… Expand
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