Asynchronous colonization of Madagascar by the four endemic clades of primates, tenrecs, carnivores, and rodents as inferred from nuclear genes.

@article{Poux2005AsynchronousCO,
  title={Asynchronous colonization of Madagascar by the four endemic clades of primates, tenrecs, carnivores, and rodents as inferred from nuclear genes.},
  author={C{\'e}line Poux and Ole Madsen and Elisabeth Marquard and David R Vieites and Wilfried W. de Jong and Miguel Vences},
  journal={Systematic biology},
  year={2005},
  volume={54 5},
  pages={719-30}
}
Madagascar harbors four large adaptive radiations of endemic terrestrial mammals: lemurs, tenrecs, carnivorans, and rodents. These rank among the most spectacular examples of evolutionary diversification, but their monophyly and origins are debated. The lack of Tertiary fossils from Madagascar leaves molecular studies as most promising to solve these controversies. We provide a simultaneous reconstruction of phylogeny and age of the four radiations based on a 3.5-kb data set from three nuclear… CONTINUE READING
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