Asymmetries of the human social brain in the visual, auditory and chemical modalities

@article{Brancucci2008AsymmetriesOT,
  title={Asymmetries of the human social brain in the visual, auditory and chemical modalities},
  author={Alfredo Brancucci and Giuliana Lucci and Andrea Mazzatenta and Luca Tommasi},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2008},
  volume={364},
  pages={895 - 914}
}
Structural and functional asymmetries are present in many regions of the human brain responsible for motor control, sensory and cognitive functions and communication. Here, we focus on hemispheric asymmetries underlying the domain of social perception, broadly conceived as the analysis of information about other individuals based on acoustic, visual and chemical signals. By means of these cues the brain establishes the border between ‘self’ and ‘other’, and interprets the surrounding social… 
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