Astronomy, Science Fiction and Popular Culture: 1277 to 2001 (and Beyond)

@article{Consolmagno1996AstronomySF,
  title={Astronomy, Science Fiction and Popular Culture: 1277 to 2001 (and Beyond)},
  author={G. Consolmagno},
  journal={Leonardo},
  year={1996},
  volume={29},
  pages={127 - 132}
}
  • G. Consolmagno
  • Published 1996
  • Art
  • Leonardo
  • Historically, developments in astronomy and changes in social environments have inspired new styles of science fiction. In return, popular culture has gained from science fiction an understanding of astronomy and of humankind’s place in the universe. However, approaches to plot and character in science-fiction stories color the presentation of astronomical discoveries, altering the way that popular culture views science fiction’s message about the universe and the self in sometimes subtle ways. 
    3 Citations

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