Assyrians, Syrians and the Greek Language in the late Hellenistic and Roman Imperial Periods*

@article{Andrade2014AssyriansSA,
  title={Assyrians, Syrians and the Greek Language in the late Hellenistic and Roman Imperial Periods*},
  author={Nathanael J. Andrade},
  journal={Journal of Near Eastern Studies},
  year={2014},
  volume={73},
  pages={299 - 317}
}
  • Nathanael J. Andrade
  • Published 2014
  • History
  • Journal of Near Eastern Studies
  • The meanings of the terms “Assyrian” and “Syrian” in the Roman imperial period constitute a complex issue. By late antiquity, Syriac-speaking authors in Sasanian Persia who lived in the district called Nōdšīragān or Nōd-Ardaxšīragān in Middle Persian and Parthian (but Adiabēnē in Greek) were positing that they, as Assyrians, were descended from Assyrians of antiquity who had inhabited the region.1 Likewise, at Edessa (’Urhāy) 
    1 Citations

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