Assyria: Sennacherib and Esarhaddon (704–669 B.C.)

@inproceedings{Grayson1992AssyriaSA,
  title={Assyria: Sennacherib and Esarhaddon (704–669 B.C.)},
  author={Albert Kirk Grayson},
  year={1992}
}
The history of Assyria during the reigns of Sennacherib and Esarhaddon is slightly different in character from that of the reigns of Tiglath-pileser III and Sargon II in that military achievements, although still of major significance, do not totally dominate the scene. Indeed, apart from the invasion of Egypt under Esarhaddon, there are no further extensive conquests to be recorded. Rather the emphasis gradually shifts to cultural enterprises, especially great building projects, and this… 
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