Associations between posttraumatic stress disorder and hemoglobin A1(C) in low-income minority patients with diabetes.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is prevalent among low-income minorities and is associated with poorer health. However, the association between PTSD and hemoglobin A1(C) (A1(C)) among patients with diabetes has not been fully described. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate associations between PTSD and A1(C) among low-income minorities with diabetes. METHOD Adults with diabetes were recruited from a network of primary care clinics. Data were obtained from surveys and electronic medical records. Lifetime PTSD symptoms were assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview-DSM-IV and depressive symptoms with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. A1(C) was obtained from chart review. RESULTS Of 103 adults analyzed, 12% had lifetime full PTSD and 12% had subthreshold PTSD. On backward stepwise logistic regression, patients with any PTSD symptoms were significantly more likely to have an A1(C) >7% compared to patients without symptoms (OR(adj) 2.98, 95% CI 1.04-8.52, P=.04). An A1(C) >7% also was associated with an interaction between PTSD symptoms and longer diabetes duration (P<.05). CONCLUSION In this cohort of low-income minorities with diabetes, lifetime PTSD symptoms were significantly associated with an A1(C) >7%.

DOI: 10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2010.12.005

Cite this paper

@article{Miller2011AssociationsBP, title={Associations between posttraumatic stress disorder and hemoglobin A1(C) in low-income minority patients with diabetes.}, author={Samantha A Miller and Carol A Mancuso and Carla Boutin-Foster and Walid Michelen and Carol McLean-Long and Brad Foote and Mary E Charlson}, journal={General hospital psychiatry}, year={2011}, volume={33 2}, pages={116-22} }