Associations between mindfulness and implicit cognition and self-reported affect.

@article{Waters2009AssociationsBM,
  title={Associations between mindfulness and implicit cognition and self-reported affect.},
  author={Andrew J. Waters and Lorraine R Reitzel and Paul M. Cinciripini and Yisheng Li and Marianne T Marcus and Jennifer Irvin Vidrine and David W. Wetter},
  journal={Substance abuse},
  year={2009},
  volume={30 4},
  pages={328-37}
}
Theory suggests that mindful individuals exhibit enhanced attentional processing (e.g., attentional control) and that they maintain a detached perspective to problematic stimuli. For smokers, smoking and affective stimuli are problematic stimuli when they try to quit. In this cross-sectional study, smokers (n = 158) completed 3 modified Stroop tasks (to assess attentional control), 3 Implicit Association Tests (IATs; to assess detached perspective), and a battery of self-report assessments… CONTINUE READING