Association of vitamin C with the risk of age‐related cataract: a meta‐analysis

@article{Wei2016AssociationOV,
  title={Association of vitamin C with the risk of age‐related cataract: a meta‐analysis},
  author={Lin Wei and Ge Liang and Chunmei Cai and Jin Lv},
  journal={Acta Ophthalmologica},
  year={2016},
  volume={94}
}
Whether vitamin C is a protective factor for age‐related cataract remains unclear. Thus, we conducted a meta‐analysis to summarize the evidence from epidemiological studies of vitamin C and the risk of age‐related cataract. 
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TLDR
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