Association of self-rated physical health and incident hypertension with O*NET factors: validation using a representative national survey.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To examine the predictive validity of Occupational Information Network (O*NET)-based constructs with health outcomes. METHODS Data from the National Survey of Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) surveys were used to examine associations of self-rated health and incident hypertension with work characteristics. Job control and substantive complexity (SC) scores derived from the O*NET were imputed to occupation in the MIDUS surveys. Validity was assessed through variance partitioning and regression models contrasting O*NET and survey-based constructs. RESULTS Congruence between control scores derived from O*NET and from self-rated scores from MIDUS was good. Shared variance between SC scores and survey-based control was less. All constructs were modest predictors of self-rated health. Substantive complexity was a stronger predictor of incident hypertension (Adjusted Odds Ratio = 1.87). CONCLUSIONS Occupational characteristics derived from O*NET variables performed as well as or better than survey-based job control in describing associations with self-rated health and incident hypertension.

DOI: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e318203f220

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@article{Meyer2011AssociationOS, title={Association of self-rated physical health and incident hypertension with O*NET factors: validation using a representative national survey.}, author={John D. Meyer and Manuel Cifuentes and Nicholas Warren}, journal={Journal of occupational and environmental medicine}, year={2011}, volume={53 2}, pages={139-45} }