Association of road-traffic accidents with benzodiazepine use

@article{Barbone1998AssociationOR,
  title={Association of road-traffic accidents with benzodiazepine use},
  author={Fabio Barbone and A Mcmahon and P. G. Davey and A M Morris and IC Reid and DG McDevitt and T M Macdonald},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={1998},
  volume={352},
  pages={1331-1336}
}
BACKGROUND Psychomotor studies suggest that commonly prescribed psychoactive drugs impair driving skills. We have examined the association between the use of psychoactive drugs and road-traffic accidents. METHODS We used dispensed prescribing as a measure of exposure in a within-person case-crossover study of drivers aged 18 years and over, resident in Tayside, UK, who experienced a first road-traffic accident between Aug 1, 1992, and June 30, 1995, and had used a psychoactive drug (tricyclic… Expand
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