Association of low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and mortality in the critically ill*

@article{Braun2011AssociationOL,
  title={Association of low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and mortality in the critically ill*},
  author={Andrea Braun and Domingo Chang and Karthik Mahadevappa and Fiona K. Gibbons and Yan Liu and Edward L. Giovannucci and Kenneth B. Christopher},
  journal={Critical Care Medicine},
  year={2011},
  volume={39},
  pages={671-677}
}
Objective:We hypothesized that deficiency in 25-hydroxyvitamin D before hospital admission would be associated with all-cause mortality in the critically ill. Design:Multicenter observational study of patients treated in medical and surgical intensive care units. Setting:A total of 209 medical and surgical intensive care beds in two teaching hospitals in Boston, MA. Patients:A total of 2399 patients, age ≥18 yrs, in whom 25-hydroxyvitamin D was measured before hospitalization between 1998 and… 
Association of Low Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels and Sepsis in the Critically Ill
TLDR
Preadmission 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency prior to hospital admission is a significant predictor of sepsis in the critically ill, and patients withSepsis who are not vitamin D sufficient have an increased risk of mortality following critical care initiation.
Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D at critical care initiation is associated with increased mortality*
TLDR
Deficiency of 25-hydroxyvitamin D at the time of critical care initiation is a significant predictor of all-cause patient mortality in a critically ill patient population and was not modified by sepsis, race, or neighborhood poverty rate, a proxy for socioeconomic status.
Association of low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and acute kidney injury in the critically ill*
TLDR
Deficiency of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D prior to hospital admission is a significant predictor of acute kidney injury and mortality in a critically ill patient population and preadmission 25-hydroxyv vitamin D deficiency is predictive of mortality.
Serum Admission 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels and Outcomes in Initially Non-Septic Critically Ill Patients
TLDR
Among critically ill patients, severely low vitamin D levels at ICU admission do not predict sepsis development, increased risk of in-hospital mortality, or longer stay in the ICU, however, these severely low admission vitamin D Levels in patients who will eventually develop sepsi are associated with development of respiratory tract infections.
Prospective Study of Vitamin D Status at Initiation of Care in Critically Ill Surgical Patients and Risk of 90-Day Mortality*
TLDR
Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels within 24 hours of ICU admission may identify patients at high risk for prolonged hospitalization, readmission, and mortality.
Deficiency in 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 30-day mortality in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock.
TLDR
Patients deficient in vitamin D within 30 days of hospital admission for severe sepsis or septic shock may be at increased risk for all-cause 30-day mortality.
Association between prehospital vitamin D status and incident acute respiratory failure in critically ill patients: a retrospective cohort study
TLDR
Prehospital 25(OH)D was associated with the risk of acute respiratory failure in the authors' critically ill patient cohort, and patients with lower 25( OH)D levels had significantly higher adjusted odds of acute lungs failure.
Vitamin D Status and the Risk for Hospital-Acquired Infections in Critically Ill Adults: A Prospective Cohort Study
TLDR
In this prospective, observational cohort of adults admitted to a single-center medical ICU, a significant association between low 25(OH)D and the risk for hospital-acquired infections was not found.
Clinical and microbiological outcome in septic patients with extremely low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels at initiation of critical care.
  • G. De Pascale, M. Vallecoccia, M. Antonelli
  • Medicine, Biology
    Clinical microbiology and infection : the official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
  • 2016
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References

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Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D at critical care initiation is associated with increased mortality*
TLDR
Deficiency of 25-hydroxyvitamin D at the time of critical care initiation is a significant predictor of all-cause patient mortality in a critically ill patient population and was not modified by sepsis, race, or neighborhood poverty rate, a proxy for socioeconomic status.
Association of low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and acute kidney injury in the critically ill*
TLDR
Deficiency of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D prior to hospital admission is a significant predictor of acute kidney injury and mortality in a critically ill patient population and preadmission 25-hydroxyv vitamin D deficiency is predictive of mortality.
Vitamin D deficiency is associated with poor outcomes and increased mortality in severely ill patients.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that low vitamin D levels are common among patients admitted to ICU and observed longer survival times among vitamin D sufficient patients, indicating that vitamin D concentration may be either a biomarker of survival or a co-factor in critically ill patients.
Vitamin D deficiency is associated with mortality in the medical intensive care unit
TLDR
The study results demonstrate an association between 25(OH)D deficiency and hospital mortality in MICU patients and a randomized prospective study to evaluate the effect of vitamin D replacement therapy on mortality is warranted.
Vitamin D deficiency in septic patients at ICU admission is not a mortality predictor.
TLDR
In this cohort, septic patients showed a significantly lower vitamin D level than trauma patients in comparison to age cohort patients with the same demographic/clinical characteristics, but no clear relationship between vitamin Dlevel and outcome was found.
Acute fluid shifts influence the assessment of serum vitamin D status in critically ill patients
TLDR
Caution is urged in interpreting serum vitamin D in critically ill patients in the context of major resuscitation, and would advocate repeating the measurement once the effects of the resuscitation have abated, as it may take up to 24 hours to resolve.
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TLDR
Hypovitaminosis D is common in general medical inpatients, including those with vitamin D intakes exceeding the recommended daily allowance and those without apparent risk factors for vitamin D deficiency.
25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of myocardial infarction in men: a prospective study.
TLDR
Low levels of 25(OH)D are associated with higher risk of myocardial infarction in a graded manner, even after controlling for factors known to be associated with coronary artery disease.
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