Association of breed with the diagnosis of congenital portosystemic shunts in dogs: 2,400 cases (1980-2002).

@article{Tobias2003AssociationOB,
  title={Association of breed with the diagnosis of congenital portosystemic shunts in dogs: 2,400 cases (1980-2002).},
  author={Karen M Tobias and Barton W. Rohrbach},
  journal={Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
  year={2003},
  volume={223 11},
  pages={
          1636-9
        }
}
  • K. TobiasB. Rohrbach
  • Published 1 December 2003
  • Medicine
  • Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
OBJECTIVE To determine the annual and overall proportion of diagnoses of congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) in dogs and identify breeds at increased risk for CPSS. DESIGN Retrospective study. ANIMALS 2,400 dogs with CPSS from veterinary teaching hospitals that reported to the Veterinary Medical Database (VMDB) from January 1, 1980 to February 28, 2002. PROCEDURE The proportion of diagnoses of CPSS was calculated for all dogs and each breed recorded in the VMDB annually and for the 22… 

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Effect of breed on anatomy of portosystemic shunts resulting from congenital diseases in dogs and cats: a review of 242 cases.

  • G. Hunt
  • Medicine
    Australian veterinary journal
  • 2004
Breed has a significant influence on shunt anatomy in dogs and cats and dogs that were not predisposed to portosystemic shunts were significantly more likely to have unusual or inoperable shunts than dogs frompredisposed breeds.

Diagnosis of congenital portosystemic shunt in miniature schnauzers 7 years of age or older (1997-2006).

Congenital PSS should be considered in mature dogs, particularly miniature schnauzers, that are presented with signs potentially consistent with hepatic encephalopathy when compared to all other breeds of dogs.

Epidemiologic factors associated with the anatomic location of intrahepatic portosystemic shunts in dogs.

Although country of origin, breed, and sex had significant associations with anatomic location of IHPSS, signalment does not appear to be a strong predictor of shunt location when used alone.

investigating congenital portosystemic shunts in Deerhounds

The prevalence of cPSS in Deerhounds found in this study is higher than has been found for mixed-breed dogs, both in the UK and the USA, which suggests a genetic component of the disease in DeerHounds.

Distribution of extrahepatic congenital portosystemic shunt morphology in predisposed dog breeds

The remarkable similarity of phenotypic variation in many dog breeds may indicate common underlying genes responsible for EHPSS across breeds.

More answers needed on congenital portosystemic shunts in dogs and cats

An appreciation of the anatomical and pathological features of CPSS at gross and microscopic levels is important for diagnostic investigation and in guiding approaches to treatment.

Diagnostic value of liver function tests and ultrasonography in dogs with suspected congenital portosystemic shunts.

In dogs with clinical signs compatible with c PSS, elevated FA is suggestive of cPSS, whereas normal paired SBA makes the presence of a cPSD unlikely, and aUS is a useful tool to diagnose cPSs.

Risk factors for urolithiasis in dogs with congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunts: 95 cases (1999-2013).

In dogs with EHPSS, shunt morphology was not associated with increased odds of urolithiasis at the initial evaluation, but the odds were significantly increased for male dogs, older dogs, and dogs that received previous medical treatment.

Analysis of the relationship of extrahepatic portosystemic shunt morphology with clinical variables in dogs: 53 cases (2009-2012).

OBJECTIVE To investigate differences in clinical variables among dogs with extrahepatic portosystemic shunts (EHPSSs) of various morphologies. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 53 dogs

Dogs ≥ five years of age at the time of congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunt diagnosis have better long-term outcomes with surgical attenuation than with medical management alone.

Dogs diagnosed at ≥ 5 years of age with EHPSS have significantly better survival times and fewer clinical signs with surgical attenuation, compared with medical management.
...

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