Association of Screen Time and Depression in Adolescence.

@article{Boers2019AssociationOS,
  title={Association of Screen Time and Depression in Adolescence.},
  author={Elroy Boers and Mohammad H. Afzali and Nicola Clare Newton and Patricia J. Conrod},
  journal={JAMA pediatrics},
  year={2019}
}
Importance Increases in screen time have been found to be associated with increases in depressive symptoms. However, longitudinal studies are lacking. Objective To repeatedly measure the association between screen time and depression to test 3 explanatory hypotheses: displacement, upward social comparison, and reinforcing spirals. Design, Setting, and Participants This secondary analysis used data from a randomized clinical trial assessing the 4-year efficacy of a personality-targeted drug… 
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Anhedonia, screen time, and substance use in early adolescents: A longitudinal mediation analysis.
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Adolescents may become desensitized and exhibit a blunted response to hedonic effects from increased screen time, which may result in increased anhedonia and greater risk for substance use through the need to compensate for the reduced experience of rewards.
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