Association between trans fatty acid intake and 10-year risk of coronary heart disease in the Zutphen Elderly Study: a prospective population-based study

@article{Oomen2001AssociationBT,
  title={Association between trans fatty acid intake and 10-year risk of coronary heart disease in the Zutphen Elderly Study: a prospective population-based study},
  author={Claudia Oomen and Marga C. Ock{\'e} and Edith J. M. Feskens and M-A. van Erp-baart and FransJ. Kok and Daan Kromhout},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2001},
  volume={357},
  pages={746-751}
}

Figures and Tables from this paper

alpha-Linolenic acid intake is not beneficially associated with 10-y risk of coronary artery disease incidence: the Zutphen Elderly Study.

After adjustment for age, standard coronary risk factors, and intake of trans fatty acids and other nutrients, alpha-linolenic acid intake was not significantly associated with CAD risk.

Dietary fat and risk of coronary heart disease: possible effect modification by gender and age.

The present study suggests that coronary heart disease risk relates to both the quantity and the quality of dietary fats.

Dietary fat intake and risk of coronary heart disease in women: 20 years of follow-up of the nurses' health study.

Findings continue to support an inverse relation between polyunsaturated fat intake and CHD risk, particularly among younger or overweight women, and trans-fat intake was associated with increased risk of CHD, particularly for younger women.

The relation between trans fatty acid levels and increased risk of myocardial infarction does not hold at lower levels of trans fatty acids in the Costa Rican food supply.

Although to date there are no TFA regulations in Costa Rica, it appears that indirect international influence has led to a TFA reduction in the food supply and, consequently, to a reduce in the risk of nonfatal MI.

Dietary fat intake and risk of coronary heart disease : the Strong Heart Study 1 4

Total fat, saturated fatty acid, and monounsaturated fatty acid intake were strong predictors of CHD mortality in American Indians aged 47–59 y, independent of other established CHD risk factors.

A Prospective Study of Trans Fatty Acids in Erythrocytes and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

After adjustment for age, smoking status, and other dietary and lifestyle cardiovascular risk factors, higher total trans fatty acid content in erythrocytes was associated with an elevated risk of CHD, providing further evidence that high trans fat consumption remains a significant risk factor for CHD after adjustment for covariates.

Circulating and Dietary Trans Fatty Acids and Incident Type 2 Diabetes in Older Adults: The Cardiovascular Health Study

Among older adults, plasma phospholipid t-16:1n9 and t-18:1 levels were positively related to DM after adjustment for de novo lipogenesis fatty acids and the need for further observational, interventional, and experimental studies of the effects TFA on DM is highlighted.

Plasma Trans Fatty Acid Levels, Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Lifestyle: Results from the Akershus Cardiac Examination 1950 Study

The findings suggest that the current low intake of iTFAs in Norway does not constitute a threat to CV health, and plasma ruminant trans fatty acids levels were favorably associated with CV risk factors.

Dietary fat intake and risk of coronary heart disease: the Strong Heart Study.

Total fat, saturated fatty acid, and monounsaturated fatty acid intake were strong predictors of CHD mortality in American Indians aged 47-59 y, independent of other established CHD risk factors.
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 35 REFERENCES

Intake of fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease in a cohort of Finnish men. The Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study.

A significant positive association was observed between the intake of trans-fatty acids and the risk of coronary death in a cohort of 21,930 smoking men aged 50-69 years who were initially free of diagnosed cardiovascular disease.

Dietary saturated and trans fatty acids and cholesterol and 25-year mortality from coronary heart disease: the Seven Countries Study.

The results of these cross-cultural analyses suggest that dietary saturated and trans fatty acids and dietary cholesterol are important determinants of differences in population rates of coronary heart disease death.

Trans-fatty acids intake and risk of myocardial infarction.

The hypothesis that intake of partially hydrogenated vegetable oils may contribute to the risk of myocardial infarction is supported, after adjustment for established coronary risk factors, multivitamin use, and intake of saturated fat, monounsaturated fat, linoleic acid, dietary cholesterol, vitamins E and C, carotene, and fiber.

Dietary fat and risk of coronary heart disease in men: cohort follow up study in the United States

The data do not support the strong association between intake of saturated fat and risk of coronary heart disease suggested by international comparisons, but they are compatible with the hypotheses that saturatedfat and cholesterol intakes affect the risk of heart disease as predicted by their effects on blood cholesterol concentration.

Association between trans fatty acid intake and cardiovascular risk factors in Europe: the TRANSFAIR study

It is concluded that at the current European intake levels of trans fatty acids they are not associated with an unfavourable serum lipid profile.

Dietary fat and coronary heart disease: a comparison of approaches for adjusting for total energy intake and modeling repeated dietary measurements.

Higher intakes of saturated and trans fats are associated with increased risk of CHD, while higher intakes of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats were associated with reduced risk, and the methods using the cumulative averages in general yielded stronger associations.

Intake of a Diet High in Trans Monounsaturated Fatty Acids or Saturated Fatty Acids: Effects on postprandial insulinemia and glycemia in obese patients with NIDDM

In the presence of unchanged glycemia, both dietary trans fatty acids and SFAs induce an increase in postprandial insulinemia in obese patients with NIDDM.

The prevalence of selected physical activities and their relation with coronary heart disease risk factors in elderly men: the Zutphen Study, 1985.

Total weekly physical activity and specific activities, e.g., gardening and walking, demonstrated generally favorable associations with cholesterol and systolic blood pressure.