Association between ozone and hospitalization for acute respiratory diseases in children less than 2 years of age.

Abstract

To clarify the health effects of ozone exposure in young children, the authors studied the association between air pollution and hospital admissions for acute respiratory problems in children less than 2 years of age during the 15-year period from 1980 to 1994 in Toronto, Canada. The daily time series of admissions was adjusted for the influences of day of the week, season, and weather. A 35% (95% confidence interval: 19%, 52%) increase in the daily hospitalization rate for respiratory problems was associated with a 5-day moving average of the daily 1-hour maximum ozone concentration of 45 parts per billion, the May-August average value. The ozone effect persisted after adjustment for other ambient air pollutants or weather variables. Ozone was not associated with hospital admissions during the September-April period. Ambient ozone levels in the summertime should be considered a risk factor for respiratory problems in children less than 2 years of age.

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@article{Burnett2001AssociationBO, title={Association between ozone and hospitalization for acute respiratory diseases in children less than 2 years of age.}, author={Richard T. Burnett and Marc H Smith-Doiron and Dave M. Stieb and Mark Raizenne and Jeffrey R. Brook and Robert Edgar Dales and Judith Leech and Sabit Cakmak and Daniel Krewski}, journal={American journal of epidemiology}, year={2001}, volume={153 5}, pages={444-52} }