Association between anticholinergic (atropinic) drug exposure and cognitive function in longitudinal studies among individuals over 50 years old: a systematic review

@article{Andre2019AssociationBA,
  title={Association between anticholinergic (atropinic) drug exposure and cognitive function in longitudinal studies among individuals over 50 years old: a systematic review},
  author={Laurine Andre and Adeline Gallini and François Montastruc and Jean-Louis Montastruc and Antoine Piau and Maryse Lapeyre-Mestre and Virginie Gardette},
  journal={European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology},
  year={2019},
  volume={75},
  pages={1631 - 1644}
}
With increasing age, adults are often exposed to anticholinergic drugs and are prone to potential adverse drug reaction, among which cognitive impairment. If the short-term cognitive effects of anticholinergic drugs are well established, their long-term cognitive effects have less been studied. To provide a systematic review of longitudinal studies which assessed the effect of anticholinergic exposure on cognition in individuals over 50 years. We searched the MEDLINE database for studies with a… 
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