Association between alcohol, cannabis, and other illicit substance abuse and risk of developing schizophrenia: a nationwide population based register study

@article{Nielsen2017AssociationBA,
  title={Association between alcohol, cannabis, and other illicit substance abuse and risk of developing schizophrenia: a nationwide population based register study},
  author={Siff Malue Nielsen and Nanna Gilliam Toftdahl and Merete Nordentoft and Carsten Rygaard Hjorth{\o}j},
  journal={Psychological Medicine},
  year={2017},
  volume={47},
  pages={1668 - 1677}
}
Background Several studies have examined whether use of substances can cause schizophrenia. However, due to methodological limitations in the existing literature (e.g. selection bias and lack of adjustment of co-abuse) uncertainties still remain. We aimed to investigate whether substance abuse increases the risk of developing schizophrenia, addressing some of these limitations. Method The longitudinal, nationwide Danish registers were linked to establish a cohort of 3 133 968 individuals (105… Expand
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