Association between Amygdala Hyperactivity to Harsh Faces and Severity of Social Anxiety in Generalized Social Phobia

@article{Phan2006AssociationBA,
  title={Association between Amygdala Hyperactivity to Harsh Faces and Severity of Social Anxiety in Generalized Social Phobia},
  author={K. Luan Phan and Daniel A. Fitzgerald and Pradeep J. Nathan and Manuel E. Tancer},
  journal={Biological Psychiatry},
  year={2006},
  volume={59},
  pages={424-429}
}
BACKGROUND Previous functional brain imaging studies of social anxiety have implicated amygdala hyperactivity in response to social threat, though its relationship to quantitative measures of clinical symptomatology remains unknown. The primary aim of this study was to examine the association between response to emotionally harsh faces in the amygdala, a region implicated in social and threat-related processing, and severity of social anxiety symptoms in patients with generalized social phobia… 
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