Assessment of rampant genitalic variation in the spider genus Homalonychus (Araneae, Homalonychidae)

@article{Crews2009AssessmentOR,
  title={Assessment of rampant genitalic variation in the spider genus Homalonychus (Araneae, Homalonychidae)},
  author={Sarah C. Crews},
  journal={Invertebrate Biology},
  year={2009},
  volume={128},
  pages={107-125}
}
  • Sarah C. Crews
  • Published 2009
  • Biology
  • Invertebrate Biology
  • . Animal genitalia are often complex and thought to vary little within species but differ between closely related species making them useful as primary characters in species diagnosis. Spiders are no exception, with nearly all of the 40,462 (at the time of this writing) described species differentiated by genitalic characteristics. However, in some cases, the genitalia of putative species are not uniform, but rather vary within species. When intraspecific variation overlaps interspecific… CONTINUE READING
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