Assessment of Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes level in ready-to-cook poultry meat: effect of various high pressure treatments and potassium lactate concentrations.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to develop a probabilistic model in order to determine the contamination level of Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-cook poultry meat, after a high pressure (HP) treatment. The model included four steps: i) Reception of raw meat materials, mincing and mixing meat, ii) Partitioning and packaging into 200-g modified atmosphere packs, iii) High pressure treatment of the meat, and iv) Storage in chilled conditions until the end of the shelf-life. The model excluded the cooking step and consumption at consumer's home as cooking practices and heating times are highly variable. The initial contamination level of Salmonella and L. monocytogenes was determined using data collected in meat primary processing plants. The effect of HP treatment and potassium lactate on microbial reduction was assessed in minced meat, using a full factorial design with three high pressure treatments (200, 350 and 500 MPa), three holding times (2, 8 and 14 min) and two potassium lactate concentrations (0 or 1.8% w/w). The inactivation curves fitted with a Weibull model highlighted that the inactivation rate was significantly dependent on the HP treatment. From the literature, it was established that Salmonella was not able to grow in the presence of lactate, under modified atmosphere and chilled conditions whereas the growth of L. monocytogenes was determined using an existing model validated in poultry (available in Seafood Spoilage and Safety Predictor software, V. 3.1). Once implemented in the Excel add-in @Risk, the model was run using Monte Carlo simulation. The probability distribution of contamination levels was determined for various scenarios. For an average scenario such as an HP treatment of 350 MPa for 8 min, of 200 g minced meat containing 1.8% lactate (pH 6.1; aw 0.96), conditioned under 50% CO2, the prevalence rate of Salmonella and L. monocytogenes, after a 20-day storage at 6 °C was estimated to be 4.1% and 7.1%, respectively. The contamination level was low considering that the product is going to be cooked by the consumer afterwards: the 99th percentile of the distribution was equal to -2.3log cfu/g for Salmonella and 0.5log cfu/g for L. monocytogenes. More generally, the model developed here from raw material reception up to the end of the shelf-life enables to recommend combinations of HP treatment and lactate formulation to guarantee an acceptable microbial concentration before cooking.

DOI: 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2014.06.019

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Cite this paper

@article{Lerasle2014AssessmentOS, title={Assessment of Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes level in ready-to-cook poultry meat: effect of various high pressure treatments and potassium lactate concentrations.}, author={Matthieu Lerasle and Sandrine Guillou and H{\'e}l{\`e}ne Simonin and V Anthoine and R Ch{\'e}ret and Michel F{\'e}d{\'e}righi and J-M Membr{\'e}}, journal={International journal of food microbiology}, year={2014}, volume={186}, pages={74-83} }