Assessing the size of the affordability problem in scholarly publishing

@inproceedings{Grossmann2019AssessingTS,
  title={Assessing the size of the affordability problem in scholarly publishing},
  author={Alexander Grossmann and Bj{\"o}rn Brembs},
  year={2019}
}
For many decades, the hyperinflation of subscription prices for scholarly journals have concerned scholarly institutions. After years of fruitless efforts to solve this “serials crisis”, open access has been proposed as the latest potential solution. However, also the prices for open access publishing are high and are rising well beyond inflation. What has been missing from the public discussion so far is a quantitative approach to determine the actual costs of efficiently publishing a… 

Current market rates for scholarly publishing services

A granular, step-by-step calculation of the costs associated with publishing primary research articles, from submission, through peer- review, to publication, indexing and archiving, finds that these costs range from less than US$200 per article in modern, large scale publishing platforms using post-publication peer-review, to about US$1,000 per articles in prestigious journals with rejection rates exceeding 90%.

Current market rates for scholarly publishing services.

A granular, step-by-step calculation of the costs associated with publishing primary research articles, from submission, through peer- review, to publication, indexing and archiving, finds that these costs range from less than US$200 per article in modern, large-scale publishing platforms using post-publication peer-review, to about US$1,000 per articles in prestigious journals with rejection rates exceeding 90%.

Current market rates for scholarly publishing services [ version 2 ; peer review : 2 approved ]

For decades, the supra-inflation increase of subscription prices for scholarly journals has concerned scholarly institutions. After years of fruitless efforts to solve this “serials crisis”, open

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