Assessing the scenic route: measuring the value of search trails in web logs

@article{White2010AssessingTS,
  title={Assessing the scenic route: measuring the value of search trails in web logs},
  author={Ryen W. White and Jeff Huang},
  journal={Proceedings of the 33rd international ACM SIGIR conference on Research and development in information retrieval},
  year={2010}
}
  • Ryen W. White, Jeff Huang
  • Published 19 July 2010
  • Computer Science
  • Proceedings of the 33rd international ACM SIGIR conference on Research and development in information retrieval
Search trails mined from browser or toolbar logs comprise queries and the post-query pages that users visit. Implicit endorsements from many trails can be useful for search result ranking, where the presence of a page on a trail increases its query relevance. Follow-ing a search trail requires user effort, yet little is known about the benefit that users obtain from this activity versus, say, sticking with the clicked search result or jumping directly to the destination page at the end of the… 

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