Assessing the impact of composting and vermicomposting on bacterial community size and structure, and microbial functional diversity of an olive-mill waste.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to couple biochemical and molecular methodologies for evaluating the impact of two recycling technologies (composting and vermicomposting) on a toxic organic waste. To do this, six enzyme activities controlling the key metabolic pathways of the breakdown of organic matter, real-time PCR assays targeting 16S rRNA genes, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiling-sequence analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA fragments have been used to determine the functional diversity, bacterial number, and bacterial community structure, respectively, in a mixture of olive waste and sheep manure, and in the derived compost and vermicompost. Both the recycling technologies were effective in activating the microbial parameters of the toxic waste, the vermicomposting being the best process to produce greater bacterial diversity, greater bacterial numbers and greater functional diversity. Although several identical populations were detected in the processed and non-processed materials, each technology modified the original microbial communities of the waste in a diverse way, indicating the different roles of each one in the bacterial selection.

DOI: 10.1016/j.biortech.2008.08.014

5 Figures and Tables

0100200200920102011201220132014201520162017
Citations per Year

693 Citations

Semantic Scholar estimates that this publication has 693 citations based on the available data.

See our FAQ for additional information.

Cite this paper

@article{Vivas2009AssessingTI, title={Assessing the impact of composting and vermicomposting on bacterial community size and structure, and microbial functional diversity of an olive-mill waste.}, author={A. Katherina Vivas and Bernab{\'e} Moreno and Sandra Garcia-Rodriguez and Erika Benitez}, journal={Bioresource technology}, year={2009}, volume={100 3}, pages={1319-26} }