Assessing the Risk of Ships Striking Large Whales in Marine Spatial Planning

@article{Redfern2013AssessingTR,
  title={Assessing the Risk of Ships Striking Large Whales in Marine Spatial Planning},
  author={Jessica V. Redfern and Megan F. McKenna and Thomas J. Moore and John Calambokidis and Monica L. DeAngelis and Elizabeth A. Becker and J. Peter Barlow and Karin A. Forney and Paul C. Fiedler and Susan J. Chivers},
  journal={Conservation Biology},
  year={2013},
  volume={27}
}
Marine spatial planning provides a comprehensive framework for managing multiple uses of the marine environment and has the potential to minimize environmental impacts and reduce conflicts among users. Spatially explicit assessments of the risks to key marine species from human activities are a requirement of marine spatial planning. We assessed the risk of ships striking humpback (Megaptera novaeangliae), blue (Balaenoptera musculus), and fin (Balaenoptera physalus) whales in alternative… 

Quantifying Ship Strike Risk to Breeding Whales in a Multiple-Use Marine Park: The Great Barrier Reef

Spatial risk assessments are an effective management tool used in multiple-use marine parks to balance the needs for conservation of natural properties and to provide for varying socio-economic

Effects of Variability in Ship Traffic and Whale Distributions on the Risk of Ships Striking Whales

Assessments of ship-strike risk for large whales typically use a single year of ship traffic data and averaged predictions of species distributions. Consequently, they do not account for variability

The Crowded Sea: Incorporating Multiple Marine Activities in Conservation Plans Can Significantly Alter Spatial Priorities

It is discovered that including hydrocarbon data in the planning process significantly alters spatial priorities, and by including increasing numbers of marine activities and zones in the Planning process, greater compromises are required to reach conservation objectives.

MITIGATING COLLISIONS BETWEEN LARGE VESSELS AND BRYDE'S WHALES IN THE HAURAKI GULF, NEW ZEALAND

The spatial and ecological overlap of whales with human activities often creates conservation concerns. Collisions between vessels and whales are a significant source of whale mortality and an issue

Quantitative assessment of the relative risk of ship strike to humpback whales in the Great Barrier Reef

There is global recognition that ship strike represents a significant risk to some populations of whales around the world. Analysis of ship strike records worldwide demonstrates that humpback whales

AN UPDATE ON WORK RELATED TO SHIP STRIKE RISK TO BLUE WHALES OFF SOUTHERN SRI LANKA

The southern coast of Sri Lanka has been identified as an area with a high risk of ship strikes due to the overlap of high densities of blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) and one of the world’s

A spatial-seasonal analysis of the oiling risk from shipping traffic to seabirds in the Aleutian Archipelago.

...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 41 REFERENCES

Modelling ship strike risk to fin, humpback and killer whales in British Columbia, Canada

Many cetacean species are susceptible to mortality or serious injury from vessel collisions. Spatially explicit assessments of risk per whale can help identify potential problem areas to guide

A broad-scale assessment of the risk to coastal seagrasses from cumulative threats

Probability and mitigation of vessel encounters with North Atlantic right whales

Successful mitigation of vessel-whale encounters requires quantitative estimates of vessel strikes, how strike rates change over time, where strikes are most likely to occur, and options for

COLLISIONS BETWEEN SHIPS AND WHALES

Although collisions with motorized ships are a recognized source of whale mortality, little has been done to compile information on the frequency of their occurrence or contributing factors. We

Mapping cumulative human impacts to California Current marine ecosystems

Quantitative assessment of the spatial patterns of all human uses of the oceans and their cumulative effects is needed for implementing ecosystem‐based management, marine protected areas, and ocean

Guiding ecological principles for marine spatial planning

The proposed four main ecological principles to guide MSP—maintaining or restoring: native species diversity, habitat diversity and heterogeneity, key species, and connectivity—and two additional guidelines, the need to account for context and uncertainty, must be explicitly taken into account in the planning process.

Association Between Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) Mortality and Ship Strikes Along the California Coast

Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) are distributed worldwide, and although severely depleted by commercial whaling, their abundance off the California coast now appears to be increasing. Little is

Comparing California Current cetacean-habitat models developed using in situ and remotely sensed sea surface temperature data

Cetacean-habitat models developed using satellite data at 8 d temporal resolution and from 5 to 35 km spatial resolu- tion were shown to have predictive ability that generally met or exceeded models developed with analogous in situ data, suggesting that the former could be an effective tool for resource managers to develop near real-time predictions of cetACEan density.

Response by vessel operators to protection measures for right whales Eubalaena glacialis in the southeast US calving ground

Combining reduced speeds with recommended routes reduces the probability of right whale mortality from ships by 71.9% from the pre-implementation period, support long-term implementation of both vessel-speed reduction and restricted vessel routes for the survival and recovery of the North Atlantic right whale.