Assessing the Effects of Climate Change on Aquatic Invasive Species

@article{Rahel2008AssessingTE,
  title={Assessing the Effects of Climate Change on Aquatic Invasive Species},
  author={Frank J. Rahel and Julian D. Olden},
  journal={Conservation Biology},
  year={2008},
  volume={22}
}
  • F. Rahel, J. Olden
  • Published 1 June 2008
  • Environmental Science
  • Conservation Biology
Abstract:  Different components of global environmental change are typically studied and managed independently, although there is a growing recognition that multiple drivers often interact in complex and nonadditive ways. We present a conceptual framework and empirical review of the interactive effects of climate change and invasive species in freshwater ecosystems. Climate change is expected to result in warmer water temperatures, shorter duration of ice cover, altered streamflow patterns… 

Figures from this paper

Managing Aquatic Species of Conservation Concern in the Face of Climate Change and Invasive Species
TLDR
The consequences of climate change will require a more active management paradigm that includes implementing habitat improvements that reduce the effects ofClimate change and creating migration barriers that prevent an influx of invasive species.
Increasing Potential Risk of a Global Aquatic Invader in Europe in Contrast to Other Continents under Future Climate Change
TLDR
The first to predict the impact of climate change on the future distribution of a globally invasive aquatic species is predicted, and it is extremely important to develop wide-ranging and effective control measures according to predicted geographical shifts and changes.
Conceptualising the interactive effects of climate change and biological invasions on subarctic freshwater fish
TLDR
The environmental effects of climate change are summarized and the ecological responses of freshwater fishes to these effects, spanning individual, population, community and ecosystem levels are illustrated, to identify three fundamental knowledge gaps.
Climate, invasive species and land use drive population dynamics of a cold‐water specialist
TLDR
Long-term data from 92 populations of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus were used to quantify additive and interactive effects of climate, invasive species and land use on population dynamics (abundance, variability and growth rate) and to consider existing abiotic and biotic stressors.
Climate warming and invasive fish species: Will they replace native fish species in waters of temperate zones?
TLDR
This work will try to predict and describe global effect of climate change on ecosystems, impact of invasive species on native fish communities and their possible replacement in the future.
Five potential consequences of climate change for invasive species.
TLDR
The stages of invasion known as the "invasion pathway" are used to identify 5 nonexclusive consequences of climate change for invasive species and the need for enhanced environmental monitoring and expanded coordination among entities involved in invasive-species management is emphasized.
Integrated Monitoring and Information Systems for Managing Aquatic Invasive Species in a Changing Climate
TLDR
Integration of biological and environmental information systems, niche models, and climate projections would improve management of aquatic ecosystems under the dual threats of biotic invasions and climate change.
Climate change and the impact of invasive species on aquatic ecosystems
The consequences of human impacts on aquatic ecosystem activities have been far reaching. Multiple stresses affect aquatic ecosystems globally. These can adversely affect physical, chemical and
Marine alien species as an aspect of global change
The transport of organisms across oceans is an anthropogenic agent of global change that has profoundly affected the natural distribution of littoral biota and altered the makeup of biogeographic
Capacity of Management Plans for Aquatic Invasive Species to Integrate Climate Change
TLDR
Activity associated with monitoring showed the highest capacity to include information on changing conditions, and future revisions to management plans are likely to be the easiest avenue through which to address climate-change effects on AIS management activities.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 187 REFERENCES
Managing Aquatic Species of Conservation Concern in the Face of Climate Change and Invasive Species
TLDR
The consequences of climate change will require a more active management paradigm that includes implementing habitat improvements that reduce the effects ofClimate change and creating migration barriers that prevent an influx of invasive species.
Integrated Monitoring and Information Systems for Managing Aquatic Invasive Species in a Changing Climate
TLDR
Integration of biological and environmental information systems, niche models, and climate projections would improve management of aquatic ecosystems under the dual threats of biotic invasions and climate change.
Linking climate change and biological invasions: Ocean warming facilitates nonindigenous species invasions
TLDR
Comparing the long-term record of weekly sessile marine invertebrate recruitment with interannual variation in water temperature suggests that the greatest effects of climate change on biotic communities may be due to changing maximum and minimum temperatures rather than annual means.
Ecological and Evolutionary Responses to Recent Climate Change
TLDR
Range-restricted species, particularly polar and mountaintop species, show severe range contractions and have been the first groups in which entire species have gone extinct due to recent climate change.
Predicting the impacts of climate change on the distribution of species: are bioclimate envelope models useful?
Modelling strategies for predicting the potential impacts of climate change on the natural distribution of species have often focused on the characterization of a species’ bioclimate envelope. A
Riparian vegetation: degradation, alien plant invasions, and restoration prospects
Rivers are conduits for materials and energy; this, the frequent and intense disturbances that these systems experience, and their narrow, linear nature, create problems for conservation of
Changing Fish Biodiversity: Predicting the Loss of Cyprinid Biodiversity Due to Global Climate Change
TLDR
It is estimated that in excess of 25,000 populations of four cyprinid species, northern redbelly dace Phoxinus eos, finescale dacePhoxinus neogaeus, fathead minnow Pimephales promelas, and pearl dace Margariscus margarita may be lost in Ontario.
Potential effects of climate change on aquatic ecosystems of the Great Plains of North America
The Great Plains landscape is less topographically complex than most other regions within North America, but diverse aquatic ecosystems, such as playas, pothole lakes, ox-bow lakes, springs,
CLIMATE CHANGE: POTENTIAL IMPACTS AND INTERACTIONS IN WETLANDS OF THE UNTTED STATES 1
ABSTRACT: Wetlands exist in a transition zone between aquatic and terrestrial environments which can be altered by subtle changes in hydrology. Twentieth century climate records show that the United
Effects of climate-driven temperature changes on the diversity of freshwater macroinvertebrates
TLDR
It is shown that trends in average temperature have already had profound impacts on species composition in lakes and streams in Northern Europe, and future climate shifts may induce strong variance in community composition.
...
...