Assessing the Causes of Late Pleistocene Extinctions on the Continents

@article{Barnosky2004AssessingTC,
  title={Assessing the Causes of Late Pleistocene Extinctions on the Continents},
  author={Anthony D. Barnosky and P. Koch and R. Feranec and S. Wing and Alan B. Shabel},
  journal={Science},
  year={2004},
  volume={306},
  pages={70 - 75}
}
  • Anthony D. Barnosky, P. Koch, +2 authors Alan B. Shabel
  • Published 2004
  • Medicine, Geography
  • Science
  • One of the great debates about extinction is whether humans or climatic change caused the demise of the Pleistocene megafauna. Evidence from paleontology, climatology, archaeology, and ecology now supports the idea that humans contributed to extinction on some continents, but human hunting was not solely responsible for the pattern of extinction everywhere. Instead, evidence suggests that the intersection of human impacts with pronounced climatic change drove the precise timing and geography of… CONTINUE READING
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