Assessing facial attractiveness: individual decisions and evolutionary constraints

@article{Kocsor2013AssessingFA,
  title={Assessing facial attractiveness: individual decisions and evolutionary constraints},
  author={Ferenc Kocsor and {\'A}. Feldmann and T. Bereczkei and J. K{\'a}llai},
  journal={Socioaffective Neuroscience \& Psychology},
  year={2013},
  volume={3}
}
Background Several studies showed that facial attractiveness, as a highly salient social cue, influences behavioral responses. It has also been found that attractive faces evoke distinctive neural activation compared to unattractive or neutral faces. Objectives Our aim was to design a face recognition task where individual preferences for facial cues are controlled for, and to create conditions that are more similar to natural circumstances in terms of decision making. Design In an event… Expand
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