Corpus ID: 163157445

Assessing Truthfulness on the Witness Stand : Eradicating Deeply Rooted Pseudoscientific Beliefs about Credibility Assessment by Triers of Fact

@inproceedings{Snook2017AssessingTO,
  title={Assessing Truthfulness on the Witness Stand : Eradicating Deeply Rooted Pseudoscientific Beliefs about Credibility Assessment by Triers of Fact},
  author={B. Snook and Meagan I. McCardle and Weyam Fahmy and J. C. House},
  year={2017}
}
  • B. Snook, Meagan I. McCardle, +1 author J. C. House
  • Published 2017
  • The Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) ruled in R. v. S. (N.) (2012) that a witness’ face provides useful cues to deceit that are important for trial fairness, and that the need to view a witness’ face while testifying ‘‘is too deeply rooted in the criminal justice system to be set aside absent compelling evidence” (para, 27). In this commentary, we present compelling empirical evidence that (a) the vast majority of cues to deception are too faint for reliable deception detection, (b) most facial… CONTINUE READING
    3 Citations

    References

    SHOWING 1-2 OF 2 REFERENCES
    alluded to the idea that the presentation of scientific evidence could have impacted their conclusion
    • Such a sentiment is perplexing because a vast amount of research on deception detection was available during the SCC’s decision-making process. As reviewed above, several meta-analyses of the detection deception research showed that most cues to deception are too faint for 27 Pär Anders Granhag, Ald
    • 2015
    The question of whether training improves the ability to detect deception was also addressed in a meta-analysis
    • In the most comprehensive quantitative 19 DePaulo et al., supra note 14; for similar arguments about the need to focus on ‘what is said’ when trying to detect deceit see Aldert Vrij, ‘‘Nonverbal dominance versus verbal accuracy in lie detection: A plea to change police practice” (2008) 35: 10 Crimin
    • 1323