Assessing Invader Roles Within Changing Ecosystems: Historical and Experimental Perspectives on an Exotic Mussel in an Urbanized Lagoon

@article{Crooks2004AssessingIR,
  title={Assessing Invader Roles Within Changing Ecosystems: Historical and Experimental Perspectives on an Exotic Mussel in an Urbanized Lagoon},
  author={Jeffrey Crooks},
  journal={Biological Invasions},
  year={2004},
  volume={3},
  pages={23-36}
}
  • J. Crooks
  • Published 1 March 2001
  • Environmental Science
  • Biological Invasions
It is often difficult to accurately assess the long-term effects of invaders because of a lack of data and the changing nature of ecosystems. However, available historical information can be used to make comparisons with current conditions and generate hypotheses that can be tested experimentally. This approach was used to examine changes in the bivalve community of Mission Bay, San Diego, California, USA. A 20-year dataset on subtidal bivalves shows a marked increase in abundance of the exotic… 
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The impact that the alien mussel Musculista senhousia has on benthic biodiversity and community structure was investigated in two Italian transitional environments, where the species was particularly
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Of all invader impacts, those likeliest to have the most wide-reaching consequences are alterations to ecosystems, as they can essentially “change the rules of existence” for broad suites of resident
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    Biological Invasions
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