Assessing Behavior in Extinct Animals: Was Smilodon Social?

@article{McCall2003AssessingBI,
  title={Assessing Behavior in Extinct Animals: Was Smilodon Social?},
  author={Sherman A. McCall and Virginia Naples and Larry Martin},
  journal={Brain, Behavior and Evolution},
  year={2003},
  volume={61},
  pages={159 - 164}
}
It has been suggested that saber-tooth species such as Smilodon fatalis were social because partially healed skeletal injuries were found at Rancho La Brea, California. This conclusion assumes injured animals would die without help. This paper will rebut assertions of sociality. First, cats use metabolic reserves to heal quickly without feeding. Second, dehydration is a more profound limitation than starvation as prey carcasses only provide a quarter of necessary water. Injured animals must be… 
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An association of at least two subadult and one adult S. fatalis from Pleistocene coastal deposits in Ecuador provides insights into the behavior of the species, and the presence of a P3 in the subadult dentaries suggests inheritance.
Hypercarnivorous teeth and healed injuries to Canis chihliensis from Early Pleistocene Nihewan beds, China, support social hunting for ancestral wolves
TLDR
This work presents the first known record of dental infection in C. chihliensis, likely inflicted by processing hard food, such as bone, and suggests similarity in feeding behavior and sociality between Chinese and American Canis across space and time.
Parallels between playbacks and Pleistocene tar seeps suggest sociality in an extinct sabretooth cat, Smilodon
TLDR
A comparison between fossil records found in Late Pleistocene tar seep deposits at Rancho La Brea in North America and counts from playback experiments used to estimate carnivore abundance in Africa supports the conclusion that Smilodon was social.
The carnivoran fauna of Rancho La Brea: Average or aberrant?
TLDR
It is confirmed that the carnivoran fauna in Rancho La Brea is unique, with preservation patterns generally supporting the carcass domination hypothesis as well as the sociality of S. fatalis.
Paleobiology of sabretooth cat Smilodon populator in the Pampean Region (Buenos Aires Province, Argentina) around the Last Glacial Maximum: Insights from carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in bone collagen
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Computed tomography reveals hip dysplasia in the extinct Pleistocene saber-tooth cat Smilodon
Reconstructing the behavior of extinct species is challenging, particularly for those with no living analogues. However, damage preserved as paleopathologies on bone can record how an animal moved in
Computed tomography reveals hip dysplasia in the extinct Pleistocene saber-tooth cat Smilodon
Reconstructing the behavior of extinct species is challenging, particularly for those with no living analogues. However, damage preserved as paleopathologies on bone can record how an animal moved in
Computed tomography reveals hip dysplasia in Smilodon: Implications for social behavior in an extinct Pleistocene predator
TLDR
Computed tomography is used to assess hypothesized etiologies of pathology in a pelvis and associated right femur of an adult Smilodon fatalis saber-toothed cat, one of the best-studied mammal species from the Pleistocene-age Rancho La Brea asphalt seeps, and suggests that this individual suffered from hip dysplasia, a congenital condition common in domestic dogs and cats.
Pathologies in the extinct Pleistocene Eurasian steppe lion Panthera leo spelaea ()-Results of fights with hyenas, bears and lions and other ecological stresses.
TLDR
Late Pleistocene Eurasian steppe lions Panthera leo spelaea (Goldfuss, 1810) frequently have skull damage attributable to bites, suggesting that this Eurasian lion pathology is the result of inter-specific (with cave bears) rather than intra-specific conflicts.
Feeding behaviour and bite force of sabretoothed predators
TLDR
The feeding behaviour of extinct sabretoothed predators (machaeroidines, nimravids, barbourofelids, machairodonts and thylacosmilines) is investigated using beam theory and it is revealed that sabretooths had a powerful bite, as strong or stronger than extant felids of similar mandibular length.
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