Assay for prostate specific antigen (PSA): Problems and possible solutions

@article{Wu1994AssayFP,
  title={Assay for prostate specific antigen (PSA): Problems and possible solutions},
  author={James T. Wu},
  journal={Journal of Clinical Laboratory Analysis},
  year={1994},
  volume={8}
}
  • J. Wu
  • Published 1994
  • Medicine
  • Journal of Clinical Laboratory Analysis
The absolute tissue specificity of prostate specific antigen (PSA) allows the use of PSA test not only for detecting recurrence or metastasis at an early stage after radical prostatectomy but also for screening prostate cancer if combined with digital rectal examination. There is also a need to improve the current PSA test to better differentiate between prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). Because of these clinical applications, a much greater demand was placed on PSA test… Expand
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References

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TLDR
PSA is useful for monitoring therapy, particularly surgical prostatectomy, and its use for general screening is debatable because of its less-than-optimal specificity, the cost of unselected screening, and the lack of evidence that early detection of prostate cancer decreases morbidity and mortality. Expand
The use of prostate specific antigen density to enhance the predictive value of intermediate levels of serum prostate specific antigen.
TLDR
Predictive value nomograms created from PSAD may allow for a more individualized approach to evaluation of patients with intermediate levels of Hybritech serum PSA. Expand
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TLDR
A quotient of serum PSA and prostate volume, which is referred to as prostate specific antigen density (PSAD), may be useful in distinguishing BPH and prostate cancer. Expand
Prostate-specific antigen as a marker for prostatic cancer: a monoclonal and a polyclonal immunoassay compared.
TLDR
With either assay there were proportional increases in PSA values with advancing cancer, and most patients with above-normal PSAvalues have clinically detectable disease. Expand
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TLDR
It is unlikely that PSA by itself will become an effective screening tool for the early diagnosis of prostate cancer, but if combined with digital rectal examination and/or transrectal ultrasound it may become a vital part of any early detection program. Expand
The value of serum prostate specific antigen determinations before and after radical prostatectomy.
TLDR
Prostatic acid phosphatase serum values after radical prostatectomy were not useful to predict persistent disease and may alter concepts about surgical results, and possibly shorten and sharpen clinical studies involving adjuvant therapy after radicalprostatectomy. Expand
Measurement of prostate-specific antigen in serum as a screening test for prostate cancer.
TLDR
The combination of measurement of the serum PSA concentration and rectal examination, with ultrasonography performed in patients with abnormal findings, provides a better method of detecting prostate cancer thanrectal examination alone. Expand
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TLDR
Clinical analysis of the first 322 patients and all patients with PSA less than or equal to 0.20 micrograms/L highlighted the requirements for strict adherence to sampling instructions and to stringent quality control also at low analyte concentrations. Expand
Prostate specific antigen in the preoperative and postoperative evaluation of localized prostatic cancer treated with radical prostatectomy.
TLDR
It is suggested that preoperative levels of prostate specific antigen are not sufficiently reliable to predict final pathological stage on an individual basis in patients with early prostatic cancer, and that the antigen is a sensitive tumor marker for the detection of residual disease after radical prostatectomy and subsequent recurrence of tumor on long-term followup. Expand
Time-resolved immunofluorometric assay of human prostate-specific antigen.
Assay of human serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is gaining importance in diagnosis and follow-up of prostatic cancer. In this time-resolved immunofluorometric assay of PSA, strip-wells wereExpand
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