Aspergillus fumigatus: contours of an opportunistic human pathogen

@article{McCormick2010AspergillusFC,
  title={Aspergillus fumigatus: contours of an opportunistic human pathogen},
  author={Allison McCormick and Jurgen Loeffler and Frank Ebel},
  journal={Cellular Microbiology},
  year={2010},
  volume={12}
}
Aspergillus fumigatus is currently the major air‐borne fungal pathogen. It is able to cause several forms of disease in humans of which invasive aspergillosis is the most severe. The high mortality rate of this disease prompts increased efforts to disclose the basic principles of A. fumigatus pathogenicity. According to our current knowledge, A. fumigatus lacks sophisticated virulence traits; it is nevertheless able to establish infection due to its robustness and ability to adapt to a wide… 
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