Aspartame: review of safety.

@article{Butchko2002AspartameRO,
  title={Aspartame: review of safety.},
  author={Harriett H. Butchko and W. Wayne Stargel and C. Phil Comer and Dale A. Mayhew and Ch. Benninger and George L. Blackburn and Leo M J de Sonneville and Raif S. Geha and Zsolt Hertelendy and Adalbert Koestner and Arthur S. Leon and George U. Liepa and Kenneth E. McMartin and Charles L. Mendenhall and Ian C. Munro and Edward J. Novotny and Andrew G. Renwick and Susan S. Schiffman and Donald L. Schomer and Bennett A. Shaywitz and Paul A. Spiers and Thomas R. Tephly and John Anthony Thomas and Friedrich Trefz},
  journal={Regulatory toxicology and pharmacology : RTP},
  year={2002},
  volume={35 2 Pt 2},
  pages={
          S1-93
        }
}
Over 20 years have elapsed since aspartame was approved by regulatory agencies as a sweetener and flavor enhancer. The safety of aspartame and its metabolic constituents was established through extensive toxicology studies in laboratory animals, using much greater doses than people could possibly consume. Its safety was further confirmed through studies in several human subpopulations, including healthy infants, children, adolescents, and adults; obese individuals; diabetics; lactating women… 

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