Aspartame: A Safety Evaluation Based on Current Use Levels, Regulations, and Toxicological and Epidemiological Studies

@article{Magnuson2007AspartameAS,
  title={Aspartame: A Safety Evaluation Based on Current Use Levels, Regulations, and Toxicological and Epidemiological Studies},
  author={Bernadene A. Magnuson and George A. Burdock and John Doull and Robert Kroes and Gary M. Marsh and Michael W. Pariza and Peter S. Spencer and William J. Waddell and Ronald Walker and G. M. Williams},
  journal={Critical Reviews in Toxicology},
  year={2007},
  volume={37},
  pages={629 - 727}
}
Aspartame is a methyl ester of a dipeptide used as a synthetic nonnutritive sweetener in over 90 countries worldwide in over 6000 products. The purpose of this investigation was to review the scientific literature on the absorption and metabolism, the current consumption levels worldwide, the toxicology, and recent epidemiological studies on aspartame. Current use levels of aspartame, even by high users in special subgroups, remains well below the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and European… 

Revisiting the safety of aspartame

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Investigation of Aspartame effects on some blood parameters after oral administration in Balb-c mice

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With the recommendation of the World Health Organization (WHO) to reduce the sugar consumption of children and adults to less than 10% of the total energy intake, many people turned to sweeteners.

Acute Impact of Artificial Sweetener, Aspartame on Blood Parameter in Mice

It is concluded that the ingestion of aspartame using the above doses has acute impact and is not dose-dependent on blood parameters which could exert further, on the long run, health risks on to other tissues of consumers.

Advantame--an overview of the toxicity data.

The carcinogenic effects of aspartame: The urgent need for regulatory re-evaluation.

A re-evaluation of the current position of international regulatory agencies must be considered an urgent matter of public health on the basis of the evidence of the potential carcinogenic effects of APM.

Perspectives on Low Calorie Intense Sweeteners with a Focus on Aspartame and Stevia

Although, intake data indicate that general consumption of LCS is relatively low, many people appear to remain concerned about their safety, particularly aspartame (E951), and stevia (steviol glycosides, E960), which has been marketed as a “natural” alternative to aspartam, however, it is unclear whether st Stevia can live up to its promises.
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