Asa Gray and Charles Darwin: Corresponding Naturalists

@inproceedings{Browne2010AsaGA,
  title={Asa Gray and Charles Darwin: Corresponding Naturalists},
  author={Janet Browne},
  year={2010}
}
Abstract. Recent work on the rise of science in the nineteenth century has encouraged historians to look again at the role of correspondence. Naturalists relied extensively on this form of contact and correspondence was a major element in generating a community of experts who agreed on what comprised valid knowledge. As a leading figure in the development of North American botany, Asa Gray found that letters with botanists and collectors all over the world greatly expanded his areas of… 

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