Artisanal Green Turtle, Chelonia mydas, Fishery of Caribbean Nicaragua: I. Catch Rates and Trends, 1991–2011

@article{Lagueux2014ArtisanalGT,
  title={Artisanal Green Turtle, Chelonia mydas, Fishery of Caribbean Nicaragua: I. Catch Rates and Trends, 1991–2011},
  author={Cynthia J. Lagueux and Cathi L. Campbell and Samantha Strindberg},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2014},
  volume={9}
}
This is the first assessment of catch rates for the legal, artisanal green turtle, Chelonia mydas, fishery in Caribbean Nicaragua. Data were collected by community members, monitoring up to 14 landing sites from 1991 to 2011. We examined take levels, and temporal and spatial variability in catch rates for the overall fishery, by region, and community using General Additive Mixed Models (GAMMs). More than 171,556 green turtles were killed during the period, with a mean estimated minimum 8,169±2… Expand
Artisanal green turtle (Chelonia mydas) fishery of Caribbean Nicaragua: II. Characterization and trends in size, sex, and maturity status of turtles killed, 1994–2011
TLDR
Evidence of resource population changes is provided and the importance of long-term monitoring of resource use is demonstrated, including improving stakeholder participation in fishery management, establishment of effective closed seasons, and year-around protection for mature females. Expand
Wayuú capture of green turtles, Chelonia mydas, in the Gulf of Venezuela: A major Caribbean artisanal turtle fishery
Abstract Fisheries, either directed or via bycatch, are a major cause of decline in global populations of marine turtles. Although artisanal fisheries are often seen as lower-impact than industrialExpand
Population trends and survival of nesting green sea turtles Chelonia mydas on Aves Island, Venezuela
TLDR
Although these findings support the importance of long-term conservation programs aimed at protecting nesting grounds, they also highlight the need to extend management actions to foraging grounds where human activities may still impact green turtle populations. Expand
Marine turtle mortality in a southern Caribbean artisanal fishery: A threat for immature green turtles
Abstract The impact of artisanal fisheries on marine turtle populations is still understudied in the southern Caribbean. In the Venezuelan Guajira Peninsula, artisanal fishing of marine turtles byExpand
Laying on the edge: demography of green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) nesting on Playa Norte, Tortuguero, Costa Rica
TLDR
The results presented here concur with results from studies of nesting females at TNP and highlight the importance of Playa Norte as a nesting ground for Atlantic green turtles. Expand
Genetic composition and origin of juvenile green turtles foraging at Culebra, Puerto Rico, as revealed by mtDNA
TLDR
This study addresses the information gap on the connectivity of the green turtle in the North Atlantic, and establishes an important baseline that can be used to determine future changes in stock composition. Expand
ommercial harvest and export of snapping turtles (Chelydra erpentina) in the United States: trends and the efficacy of size limits t reducing harvest
As Asian turtle populations have crashed, China has increasingly turned to international import to meet domestic demand, which has increased pressure on global turtle populations. Snapping turtlesExpand
Ethological and phenetic characterization of sea turtle's fishing stock in Jardines del Rey archipelago (Cuba)
TLDR
It is probable that this species has been overfished and the use of the E. imbricata sexual maturity criteria assessed by the Cuban legal fishery to manage other sea turtle species was a mistake according to the literature data. Expand
Spatial Ecology of Sub-Adult Green Turtles in Coastal Waters of the Turks and Caicos Islands: Implications for Conservation Management
Marine turtles are of conservation concern throughout their range, with past population declines largely due to exploitation through both legal and illegal take, and incidental capture in fisheries.Expand
Illegal capture and black market trade of sea turtles in Pisco, Peru: the never-ending story
TLDR
Numbers remains high with almost 1000 turtles in a five-year period and an illegal trade persists, suggesting urgent measures are needed to recover this endangered species. Expand
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 124 REFERENCES
Population ecology of the green/black turtle (Chelonia mydas) in Bahía Magdalena, Mexico
TLDR
Growth data indicate that black turtles may spend up to 20 years in Bahía Magdalena before they reach maturity at about 77 cm SCL, and growth was seasonal and three times higher in summer than in winter, while body CI was also significantly higher during the summer months. Expand
POPULATION ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT NEEDS OF A GREEN TURTLE, Chelonia mydas, POPULATION IN THE WESTERN CARIBBEAN
TLDR
There is evidence that the Tortuguero population is probably declining, however, the severity of the threat depends in part on the proportion of large juveniles from this population that are exposed to the Nicaragua turtle fishery. Expand
Movement Patterns of Green Turtles (Chelonia mydas) in Cuba and Adjacent Caribbean Waters Inferred from Flipper Tag Recaptures
TLDR
Results for a broad range of populations and across life stages underscore the regionwide significance of Cuban sites as critical habitats or migratory corridors. Expand
Twenty-Six Years of Green Turtle Nesting at Tortuguero, Costa Rica: An Encouraging Trend
The green turtle (Chelonia mydas) population that nests at Tortuguero, Costa Rica, is the largest in the Atlantic by at least an order of magnitude. Surveys to monitor the nesting activity on theExpand
Long-term conservation efforts contribute to positive green turtle Chelonia mydas nesting trend at Tortuguero, Costa Rica
Abstract Worldwide, green turtle Chelonia mydas populations have declined and the species is classified as globally endangered. Tortuguero, Costa Rica, hosts the largest remaining green turtleExpand
Encouraging outlook for recovery of a once severely exploited marine megaherbivore
TLDR
It is shown that six of the major green turtle nesting populations in the world have been increasing over the past two to three decades following protection from human hazards such as exploitation of eggs and turtles, suggesting that the green turtle is not on the brink of global extinction. Expand
Monitoring green turtles (Chelonia mydas) at a coastal foraging area in Baja California, Mexico: multiple indices to describe population status
TLDR
Low survival among juveniles, declining annual catch per unit effort, and the presence of butchered carcasses indicated human activities continue to impact green turtles at this foraging area of Bahía de los Angeles, Mexico. Expand
EVALUATING TRENDS IN ABUNDANCE OF IMMATURE GREEN TURTLES, CHELONIA MYDAS, IN THE GREATER CARIBBEAN
TLDR
Estimates of annual abundance for juvenile green turtles at two foraging grounds in the Bahamas based on long-term capture-mark-recapture (CMR) studies at Union Creek and Conception Creek are generated using a two-stage approach. Expand
Survival probability estimates for immature green turtles Chelonia mydas in the Bahamas
TLDR
This study reports the first application of the joint analysis of live-recapture and dead-recovery data to sea turtle populations and demonstrates the advantages of this modeling approach. Expand
Migration of green turtles Chelonia mydas from Tortuguero, Costa Rica
TLDR
The proximity of foraging grounds to the nesting beach (mean 512 km) may permit female turtles to invest more energy in reproduction and hence the Tortuguero population may have greater potential for recovery than other green turtle nesting populations. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...