Artificial ionospheric modification: The Metal Oxide Space Cloud experiment

@article{Caton2017ArtificialIM,
  title={Artificial ionospheric modification: The Metal Oxide Space Cloud experiment},
  author={Ronald G. Caton and T. R. Pedersen and Keith M. Groves and John R. Hines and Paul S. Cannon and Natasha Jackson‐Booth and Richard Parris and Jeffrey M. Holmes and Yi‐Jiun Su and Evgeny V. Mishin and Patrick A. Roddy and Albert A. Viggiano and Nicholas S. Shuman and Shaun G. Ard and Paul A. Bernhardt and Carl L. Siefring and John M. Retterer and Erhan Kudeki and Pablo M. Reyes},
  journal={Radio Science},
  year={2017},
  volume={52},
  pages={539 - 558}
}
Clouds of vaporized samarium (Sm) were released during sounding rocket flights from the Reagan Test Site, Kwajalein Atoll in May 2013 as part of the Metal Oxide Space Cloud (MOSC) experiment. A network of ground‐based sensors observed the resulting clouds from five locations in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Of primary interest was an examination of the extent to which a tailored radio frequency (RF) propagation environment could be generated through artificial ionospheric modification… 

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