Artificial circumzenithal and circumhorizontal arcs

@article{Selmke2017ArtificialCA,
  title={Artificial circumzenithal and circumhorizontal arcs},
  author={Markus Selmke and Sarah Selmke},
  journal={American Journal of Physics},
  year={2017},
  volume={85},
  pages={575-581}
}
A glass of water, with white light incident upon it, is typically used to demonstrate a rainbow. On a closer look, this system turns out to be a rather close analogy of a different kind of atmospheric optics phenomenon altogether: circumzenithal and the circumhorizontal halos. The work we present here should provide a missing practical demonstration for these beautiful and common natural ice halo displays. 
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