Artificial Selection and Domestication: Modern Lessons from Darwin’s Enduring Analogy

@article{Gregory2008ArtificialSA,
  title={Artificial Selection and Domestication: Modern Lessons from Darwin’s Enduring Analogy},
  author={T. Ryan Gregory},
  journal={Evolution: Education and Outreach},
  year={2008},
  volume={2},
  pages={5-27}
}
  • T. Gregory
  • Published 14 January 2009
  • Biology
  • Evolution: Education and Outreach
It is clear from his published works that Charles Darwin considered domestication to be very useful in exploring and explaining mechanisms of evolutionary change. Not only did domestication occupy the introductory chapter of On the Origin of Species, but he revisited the topic in a two-volume treatise less than a decade later. In addition to drawing much of his information about heredity from studies of domesticated animals and plants, Darwin saw important parallels between the process of… 
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