Arthur Holmes’ vision of a geological timescale

@article{Lewis2001ArthurHV,
  title={Arthur Holmes’ vision of a geological timescale},
  author={Cherry L. E. Lewis},
  journal={Geological Society, London, Special Publications},
  year={2001},
  volume={190},
  pages={121 - 138}
}
  • C. Lewis
  • Published 2001
  • Geology
  • Geological Society, London, Special Publications
Abstract Arthur Holmes (1890–1965) was a British geoscientist who devoted much of his academic life to trying to further the understanding of geology by developing a radiometric timescale. From an early age he held in his mind a clear vision of how such a timescale would correlate and unify all geological events and processes. He pioneered the uranium-lead dating technique before the discovery of isotopes; he developed the principle of ‘initial ratios’ thirty years before it became recognized… 

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