Art of cheese-making is 7,500 years old

@article{Subbaraman2012ArtOC,
  title={Art of cheese-making is 7,500 years old},
  author={N. Subbaraman},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2012}
}
Neolithic pottery fragments from Europe reveal traces of milk fats. 
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