Art in the Streets: Modern Art, Museum Practice and the Urban Environment in Contemporary Morocco

@article{Pieprzak2008ArtIT,
  title={Art in the Streets: Modern Art, Museum Practice and the Urban Environment in Contemporary Morocco},
  author={Katarzyna Pieprzak},
  journal={Review of Middle East Studies},
  year={2008},
  volume={42},
  pages={48 - 54}
}
Every summer, cultural festivals take place all over Morocco, and streets in towns and cities become animated scenes for the articulation of Moroccan contemporary culture. So animated, heterogeneous and pluralistic has this festival scene become that the semiofficial newspaper for the Islamist PJD party has called these street festivals “vectors of decadence” and performing-artist union officials have declared that they feel threatened by the “foreign invasion” of internationally-based diaspora… 

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