Arsenic Exposure and Risk of Spontaneous Abortion, Stillbirth, and Infant Mortality

@article{Rahman2010ArsenicEA,
  title={Arsenic Exposure and Risk of Spontaneous Abortion, Stillbirth, and Infant Mortality},
  author={A. Rahman and L. Persson and B. Nermell and S. El Arifeen and E. Ekstr{\"o}m and Allan H. Smith and M. Vahter},
  journal={Epidemiology},
  year={2010},
  volume={21},
  pages={797-804}
}
Background: Millions of people worldwide are drinking water with elevated arsenic concentrations. Epidemiologic studies, mainly cross-sectional in design, have suggested that arsenic in drinking water may affect pregnancy outcome and infant health. We assessed the association of arsenic exposure with adverse pregnancy outcomes and infant mortality in a prospective cohort study of pregnant women. Methods: A population-based, prospective cohort study of 2924 pregnant women was carried out during… Expand

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