Arnald of Villanova's Regimen Almarie (Regimen castra sequentium) and Medieval Military Medicine

@inproceedings{Mcvaugh1992ArnaldOV,
  title={Arnald of Villanova's Regimen Almarie (Regimen castra sequentium) and Medieval Military Medicine},
  author={Michael R. Mcvaugh},
  year={1992}
}
"Arnald of Villanova's Regimen Almarie (Regimen castra sequentium) and Medieval Military Medicine." It seems likely that the short work entitled Regimen de castra sequentium and published among the writings of Arnald of Villanova was composed by him on his crossing from Sicily to Spain in late 1309 to meet with his king, James II of Aragon, who was then besieging Almeria. The work is a miscellany of practical advice on maintaining an army in health: on where to locate a camp, how to identify… 
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