Arm use after left or right hemiparesis is influenced by hand preference.

@article{Rinehart2009ArmUA,
  title={Arm use after left or right hemiparesis is influenced by hand preference.},
  author={Jenny K Rinehart and Rena D Singleton and John C. Adair and Joseph R. Sadek and K. Y. Haaland},
  journal={Stroke},
  year={2009},
  volume={40 2},
  pages={
          545-50
        }
}
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Despite strong evidence for hand preference and its impact on motor performance, its influence on stroke rehabilitation has not been routinely considered. Previous research demonstrates that patients with hemiparetic stroke use their ipsilesional, nonparetic arm 5 to 6 times more frequently than their paretic arm, but it is unknown if such use varies with laterality of hemiparesis. The purpose of our study was to determine if the right arm is used more frequently in right… CONTINUE READING

Figures, Tables, and Topics from this paper.

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 37 CITATIONS

Development of a classification scale for arm use following stroke

VIEW 4 EXCERPTS
CITES BACKGROUND & METHODS
HIGHLY INFLUENCED

Motor impairment of the ipsilesional body side in poststroke subjects.

  • Journal of bodywork and movement therapies
  • 2013
VIEW 2 EXCERPTS
CITES RESULTS
HIGHLY INFLUENCED

Relationship between arm usage and instrumental activities of daily living after unilateral stroke.

  • Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation
  • 2012
VIEW 3 EXCERPTS
CITES RESULTS, BACKGROUND & METHODS

A Taxonomy of Functional Upper Extremity Motion

Heidi M. Schambra, Avinash Parnandi, +3 authors Dawn Nilsen
  • Front. Neurol.
  • 2019
VIEW 1 EXCERPT
CITES BACKGROUND

Actigraph assessment for measuring upper limb activity in unilateral cerebral palsy

  • Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
  • 2019
VIEW 1 EXCERPT
CITES BACKGROUND

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 35 REFERENCES

The control of movement in the preferred and non-preferred hands.

  • The Quarterly journal of experimental psychology
  • 1979
VIEW 4 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL