Aristarchus's On the Sizes and Distances of the Sun and the Moon: Greek and Arabic Texts

@article{Berggren2007AristarchussOT,
  title={Aristarchus's On the Sizes and Distances of the Sun and the Moon: Greek and Arabic Texts},
  author={J. L. Berggren and N. Sidoli},
  journal={Archive for History of Exact Sciences},
  year={2007},
  volume={61},
  pages={213-254}
}
In the 1920s, T. L. Heath pointed out that historians of mathematics have "given too little attention to Aristarchus" (Heath 1921, vol. 2, 1). This is still true today. The Greek text of Aristarchus's On the Sizes and Distances of the Sun and the Moon has received little attention; the Arabic editions virtually none.1 For these reasons, much of what this text has to tell us about ancient and medieval mathematics and the mathematical sciences has gone unnoticed. When one considers that many of… Expand
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