Areas 3a, 3b, and 1 of Human Primary Somatosensory Cortex 1. Microstructural Organization and Interindividual Variability

@article{Geyer1999Areas33,
  title={Areas 3a, 3b, and 1 of Human Primary Somatosensory Cortex 1. Microstructural Organization and Interindividual Variability},
  author={Stefan Geyer and Axel Schleicher and Karl Zilles},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={1999},
  volume={10},
  pages={63-83}
}
This study defines cytoarchitectonic areas 3a, 3b, and 1 of the human primary somatosensory cortex by objective delineation of cytoarchitectonic borders and ensuing cytoarchitectonic classification. This avoids subjective evaluation of microstructural differences which has so far been the only way to structurally define cortical areas. Ten brains were fixed in formalin or Bodian's fixative, embedded in paraffin, sectioned as a whole in the coronal plane at 20 microm, and cell stained. Cell… 
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