Are we dependent upon coffee and caffeine? A review on human and animal data

@article{Nehlig1999AreWD,
  title={Are we dependent upon coffee and caffeine? A review on human and animal data},
  author={A. Nehlig},
  journal={Neuroscience \& Biobehavioral Reviews},
  year={1999},
  volume={23},
  pages={563-576}
}
  • A. Nehlig
  • Published 1999
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews
Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive substance and has been considered occasionally as a drug of abuse. The present paper reviews available data on caffeine dependence, tolerance, reinforcement and withdrawal. After sudden caffeine cessation, withdrawal symptoms develop in a small portion of the population but are moderate and transient. Tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity has been shown in animals. In humans, tolerance to some subjective effects of caffeine… Expand

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