Are we aware of neural activity in primary visual cortex?

@article{Crick1995AreWA,
  title={Are we aware of neural activity in primary visual cortex?},
  author={F. Crick and C. Koch},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1995},
  volume={375},
  pages={121-123}
}
It is usually assumed that people are visually aware of at least some of the neuronal activity in the primary visual area, V1, of the neocortex. But the neuroanatomy of the macaque monkey suggests that, although primates may be aware of neural activity in other visual cortical areas, they are not directly aware of that in area V1. There is some psychophysical evidence in humans that supports this hypothesis. 
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